Cybercash 2.1.2 insecurities

Summary
Description:A number of insecurities in Cybercash
Author:Megan Alexander <malexander@COMMANDCOM.COM>
Compromise:Get credit card numbers, plaintext password registry settings, tons of fun stuff!
Vulnerable Systems:Windows95 and NT systems running Cybercash 2.1.2 or Verifone vPOS
Date:11 November 1997
Details


Date: Tue, 11 Nov 1997 14:32:15 -0500
From: Megan Alexander <malexander@COMMANDCOM.COM>
To: BUGTRAQ@NETSPACE.ORG
Subject: Re: Major security flaw in Cybercash 2.1.2

This is also an issue with Verifone vPOS, which ships with the Microsoft
Site Server, partnered as an evaluation version.

Most of these credit card validators have the ability to store items to a
logfile, which is often turned on in debugging and testing and never turned
off by the administrator...

Here are some other interesting things about vPOS and Site Server, for the
e-commerce-minded among us:

1. In addition to the debug log mentioned above, the actual Commerce Server
store also has the ability to write a very lengthy logfile, called
ordinitbf, which can be added into the global.asa of the store, and called
using a scriptor component. Again, not very useful unless an administrator
turns on logging and never turns it off.

Things included in this file include: all shopper info, all address info
(billing and shipping), credit card info, including name, exp, and
number... you get the idea.

2. the vPOS service cannot be started automatically. The encryption string
MUST be typed in at start-up. This sequence cannot be automated. Therefore,
if a server using vPOS is somehow compromised in the middle of the night,
and no administrator is there to restart the service, all transactions will
fail until the next time the administrator restarts the service.

3. In order for vPOS to work with Microsoft Site Server (Commerce Server
2.0), the Commerce Server version 1.0 component wrapper must be used. In
order to trick the v1 component wrapper into thinking that Site Server is
really Merchant Server 1.0, A LOT of registry entries must be made.

Some of these registry entries include the SQL passwords, the NT
administrator login  passwords, etc. Fun for the whole family, and
everything in plaintext.

4. The merchant certificates are stored in the SQL database whose passwords
you just typed in plaintext into the registry.

Sigh.

-megan

Megan Alexander: Webmaster, etc.
Command Software Systems
(561)575.3200 x 170
http://www.commandcom.com


-----Original Message-----
From:   Tim Scanlon [SMTP:tfs@CHARM.SEALSOFT.COM]
Sent:   Saturday, November 08, 1997 12:35 AM
To:     BUGTRAQ@NETSPACE.ORG
Subject:        Re: Major security flaw in Cybercash 2.1.2

On Fri, 7 Nov 1997 , Anonymous  said:
>In CyberCash's server, when the "DEBUG" flag is on, the contents of
>all credit card transactions are written to a log file (named
>"Debug.log" by default).
>
>The easiest workaround I've found is to simply delete the existing
>Debug.log file.  In my experience with the Solaris release, the
>CyberCash software does not create this file at start time when the
>DEBUG flag is set to 0.
>

ln -s Debug.log /dev/null

Works easier than deleting over and over I'd hazard.

Tim


---
________________________________________________________________
tfs@sealsoft.com                (NeXTmail, MIME)     Tim Scanlon
tfs@epic.org                    (PGP key by req)  crypto is good
Seal Technologies Inc.                        I own my own words

Date: Sun, 23 Nov 1997 04:08:28 -0500
From: Pat Farrell 
To: BUGTRAQ@NETSPACE.ORG
Subject: CyberCash response to: Major security flaw in Cybercash 2.1.2

This message is going to bugtraq because I first heard of
the report from this list. I believe it is in the spirit of
the list's usage guidelines. Redistributed in accordance
to the terms below.

Other responses should be off list, directly to me.

Pat

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

I have been asked by Steve Crocker, CyberCash's Chief Technical Officer,
to post this message concerning security of CyberCash's software.

The following should appear in its entirety if it's printed at all.
Permission is granted to repost this message as long as the entire
message is reposted unaltered with the PGP signature intact.

Pat




The following message appeared on the net.
> === begin quoted message ===
>
>From: Anonymous 
>Subject:      Major security flaw in Cybercash 2.1.2
>To: BUGTRAQ@NETSPACE.ORG
>
>CyberCash v. 2.1.2 has a major security flaw that causes all credit
>card information processed by the server to be logged in a file with
>world-readable permissions.  This security flaw exists in the default
>CyberCash installation and configuration.
>
>The flaw is a result of not being able to turn off debugging.  Setting
>the "DEBUG" flag to "0" in the configuration files simply has no
>effect on the operation of the server.
>
>In CyberCash's server, when the "DEBUG" flag is on, the contents of
>all credit card transactions are written to a log file (named
>"Debug.log" by default).
>
>The easiest workaround I've found is to simply delete the existing
>Debug.log file.  In my experience with the Solaris release, the
>CyberCash software does not create this file at start time when the
>DEBUG flag is set to 0.
>
>The inability to turn off debugging is noted on CyberCash's web site
>under "Known Limitations".  The fact that credit card numbers are
>stored in the clear, in a world readable file, is not.
>
> === end quoted message ===


We have taken this quite seriously and have put through a full release
of our software which will be available Monday 11/24 for three
platforms and others shortly thereafter. The flaw was in the
debug logging function, not in the protocols or core
implementation.  Nonetheless, the effect was an unnecessary
exposure of potentially sensitive information, and it shouldn't
have gone out the door that way.  We're tightening our internal
processes to avoid this in the future.

That said, here's the actual exposure.  The credit card information
that's in the clear in the log comes from "merchant-initiated"
transactions, which means the merchant obtains the credit
card number from somewhere -- phone, mail, fax, SSL-protected
Internet interaction, or unprotected Internet interaction.
The merchant thus has the same info in the clear already.

If the card number was provided via a wallet, then the card
number is blinded at the consumer's end.  It is therefore
not in the clear as it passes through the merchant's machine
and the reported exposure does not apply..

In order for the unprotected log to pose a risk of exposure,
someone has to be able to gain access to the merchant's machine.
If the machine is well protected, viz behind a firewall and/or
carefully configured, presumably an outsider won't be able to
gain access.  And in terms of the *additional* exposure the
open log represents over existing risks, if the same information
is accessible in the clear elsewhere on the machine, eliminating
from the log or encrypting the log provides little or no real
protection.  We continue to advise merchants to take strong steps
to protect their machines.

To our knowledge, the exposure documented above has not resulted
in the actual loss of any customer data or other security incident.


- ----------------------------------
Steve Crocker                                   Desk:  +1 703 716 5214
CyberCash, Inc.                                 Main:  +1 703 620 4200
2100 Reston Parkway                             Fax:   +1 703 620 4215
Reston, VA 20191                                crocker@cybercash.com

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Pat Farrell    CyberCash, Inc.          w:(703) 715-7834
Senior Engineer                   pfarrell@cybercash.com
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